American made: the new manufacturing landscape

During the recession many companies retooled their operations installing more and more automation. Today, there are many (certainly not a total replacement for those 10s of thousands of “old” manufacturing jobs lost) new and highly skilled–and high paying–jobs in the new manufacturing workplace.

Follow this week-long audio report on the re-emergence of American manufacturing.

Google HR Boss Says 58% Of Résumés Get Trashed Because Of One Spelling Mistake

Google HR boss Laszlo Bock likes to cite a startling figure: 58% of résumé s have typos.

“Typos are deadly because employers interpret them as a lack of detail-orientation, as a failure to care about quality,” he says.

For Google — a company that sees 50,000 résumés a week —  the typo is one of five résumé  mistakes that will immediately land yours  in the “no” pile.

Yet the mistake doesn’t stem from laziness, Bock says, but obsessiveness.

Read more here

Only 59 percent of first-time students at 4-year institutions complete their degrees within six years

Of those that make it to graduation, one-in-three hold a job that does not require a college degree, according to a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Recent college graduates are more likely to be unemployment and underemployment for recent graduates has risen since 2001….  Part of the blame for high college dropout rates and underemployment rests on the shoulders of high schools, he says, which have used a “lazy approach” to push all students toward college.

Read the complete article here

Helicopter Parents: Learned Helplessness of a Generation

Adding to my amazement that 8% of college grads take their parents along on their first job interview comes this news that it’s now a subject of scholarly research:

“While parental involvement might be the extra boost that students need to build their own confidence and abilities, over-parenting appears to do the converse in creating a sense that one cannot accomplish things socially or in general on one’s own,” wrote the authors, two professors from California State University Fresno. The authors of “Helicopter parents: An Examination of the Correlates of Over-parenting of College Students,” Jill C. Bradley-Geist and Julie B. Olson-Buchanan, go on to detail how over-parenting can actually ruin a child’s abilities to deal with the workplace.

Vannucci also had a college-aged client whose parents did her homework for her. The client’s mother explained that she didn’t want her daughter to struggle the same way she had. The daughter, however, “has grown up to be an adult who has anxiety attacks anytime someone asks her to do something challenging” because she never learned how to handle anything on her own.

Barrow knows classmates who call after every test, or whose parents text or Facebook asking how particular questions went. “Those kids are still very reliant on their parents making decisions and doing their everyday life,” she said. “It’s a tough way to head into life if you are reliant on other people to help with decisions.”

Debunking the “college for all” myth with the 1:2:7 ratio

I am driven to distraction by all the messaging and programming (AVID, Gear UP, AP, etc.) in high school the pimps the notion that everyone needs to go to college (read: a four year university). These two videos make the point very well. The first is just too well done to be ignored and raises the ratio of 1:2:7 (watch the video and I’m sure you’ll agree this is true based on your real life experience/observations. The next is with Mike Rowe of “Dirty Jobs” fame who is both articulate and passionate about debunking this misrepresentation of real economic needs and rewards.