Are we sending the wrong message?

I’ve got an ax to grind: why is it that we have all this messaging about college and even programs that divert kids from skill-based classes into classes intended to prepare kids to go to college?

Consider the following:

  • About 20-25% of our kids don’t finish high school. While there are many reasons for this, I wonder if the DNA syndrome is one of them: “if high school is to prepare me for  college and I have no plans/interest in going to college, then high school is DNA–Does Not Apply to me, either.”
  • “The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that only 20 percent of U.S. jobs require a bachelor’s degree or more. About another 10 percent require some post-high school instruction, including an associate’s degree.” College is not for all
  • Skilled Trades Remain Hardest Job to Fill in U.S. for Fourth Consecutive Year, according to the Manpower Group’s Annual Talent Shortage Survey
  • Four years in college and decades in debt—is it worth it? 
  • “It’s correct that education experts have rarely, if ever, suggested that everyone would go to college. But they’ve created a climate in which going to college is the main or only standard of success in high school. If you don’t go to college, you’re judged second-rate and a failure. From students’ perspective, college-for-all is the reigning ethos. And it’s the students, not the experts, who matter most.” College is not for all

 

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