These Are The Skills Bosses Say New College Grads Do Not Have

The lack of these skills, especially critical thinking and analysis, can be attributed to the K-12 emphasis on testing rather than problem solving.

 

PayScale’s report – taken from data acquired as part of the organization’s larger employee compensation survey – shows that certain soft and hard skills tend to be missing from young graduates.

Among ‘hard skills’ – unambiguous proficiencies useful on the job – managers said new grads were most lacking in writing proficiency. In fact, 44% of managers surveyed said as much. Also, 39% of managers found their recently matriculated hires to be lacking in public speaking skills and 36% claimed they needed to bone up on their data analysis talents—that includes knowledge of programs like Excel, Tableau, Python, R, etc.

Among soft skills, managers were even more united in their opinions of where they see a dearth. According to PayScale’s survey, 60% of managers claim the new graduates they see taking jobs within their organizations do not have the critical thinking and problem solving skills they feel are necessary for the job. Additionally, 56% of managers said recent grads do not pay attention to detail and 46% said the young workers would do well to hone their communication skills. Some 44% of managers reported a lack of leadership qualities and 36% reported lower-than-needed interpersonal and teamwork skills.

That managers feel the latest additions to their organizations need to develop some further skills may not be entirely surprising. On the other side of the table, though, recent graduates seem to feel – for the most part – that they are going into their new gigs reasonably prepared.

According to PayScale’s survey, 25% of recent grads felt they were “extremely prepared” for their new jobs while only 8% of managers agreed. 62% of recent grads felt they were “mostly prepared,” while only 42% of managers concurred. When asked whether they were “well prepared,” 87% of recent grads said they were, but only 50% of managers seemed to feel that way.

The gap between the skills college grads have and what they need to succeed at their new careers is very real. Luckily the chasm can be bridged by some added instruction and earned experience.

 

This one uberskill will always keep you employed

There’s one vital skill,… that transcends many jobs and fields and may be every worker’s best shot at financial security. Schools don’t usually teach it, and employers don’t usually mention it in job postings. Yet it will help you get hired, outperform your peers, find the best opportunities and stay a step or two ahead of the computers, robots and other machines that are making many jobs obsolete…. employers usually recognize them as creative problem-solvers who see the big picture and make insightful connections in ways even a supercomputer can’t. They might have technical skills, but they also tend to read a lot, write well and show curiosity in many unrelated things.

Gain a competitive advantage in the job search–it’s not about grades

73% of HR professionals… feel that job applicants do a “bad job” of tailoring their resumes to specific positions…. Only 28% of candidates said they always customize their resumes for a position, which means the majority of candidates are not taking advantage of the opportunity to highlight their most relevant experience.

… keywords are a must with 63% of HR professional respondents who reported that job applicants do a “good job” of including relevant keywords in their resumes.
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The average corporate recruiter manages approximately 20 to 30 open requisitions at a time, so when hundreds of applicants apply to a company posting, that person can only spend less than two hours per position to review applications even if he works a 50 hour week…. If recruiters on average only get to the first 10% to 12% of applicants, the closer you are to the top, the more likely your application will be noticed.

“Whether it’s meeting at a networking event, making an introduction via LinkedIn or having a friend recommend you, networking is your ticket to better job seeking results,”

In this age of social super-connectedness, nothing trumps a warm in-person personality (so make a phone call!)

Read the full article here

4 of the Worst Lessons You Learn in College

Worst Lesson #2.   Second chances are a common occurrence

Most colleges have policies that allow students to retake courses they fail without much consequence. This is one college’s policy on retaking courses: “If you earn a failing grade (F, WU, or FIN) in a course and then retake the course in a subsequent semester, earning a grade of A, B, C, or CR, both grades will remain on the transcript. However, the failing grade will no longer be calculated in your … GPA.” Many other schools have similar policies.

At work, if an employee continues to submit work that’s sub-par and doesn’t meet expectations, that employee will more than likely be fired after a short period of time. He or she would not be able to continue to resubmit his or her work until it was correct on the company’s dollar.
The same applies to late policies and missed assignments. Many college classrooms are far more lenient than any workplace would ever be.
Read more:

American made: the new manufacturing landscape

During the recession many companies retooled their operations installing more and more automation. Today, there are many (certainly not a total replacement for those 10s of thousands of “old” manufacturing jobs lost) new and highly skilled–and high paying–jobs in the new manufacturing workplace.

Follow this week-long audio report on the re-emergence of American manufacturing.

Google HR Boss Says 58% Of Résumés Get Trashed Because Of One Spelling Mistake

Google HR boss Laszlo Bock likes to cite a startling figure: 58% of résumé s have typos.

“Typos are deadly because employers interpret them as a lack of detail-orientation, as a failure to care about quality,” he says.

For Google — a company that sees 50,000 résumés a week —  the typo is one of five résumé  mistakes that will immediately land yours  in the “no” pile.

Yet the mistake doesn’t stem from laziness, Bock says, but obsessiveness.

Read more here